The Gentlemen Review

Guy Ritchie made his name with Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and one of my personal favourite films: Snatch. With the Gentlemen, he has returned to his British gangster film roots and brought to it a cast packed with big names and huge talent. His writing and his dialogue are what made the films hits, and from the trailers it just looked like him flexing his writing and directorial muscles after years working in different genres. 

In recent years he’s made Aladdin and Man from Uncle, two films I really enjoyed but didn’t quite have that Guy Ritchie style I love. I missed catching King Arthur, but that film just didn’t seem like it suited the director’s flair. The Gentlemen, whilst initially giving me a Kingsman vibe, is Ritchie going back to what he does better than anyone. It’s fast paced, anarchic, over the top fun, and that’s a word that’s relatively dull to use to describe a film but honestly, it’s how it is best described.

The last few films I have watched have been Bombshell and Little Women, two dramas about real issues and bringing up emotions. The Gentlemen never tries to kid you into thinking it’s going to be that. It knows what it wants to do, and it goes about achieving it as best it can. Getting the talents of Matthew McConaughey, Charlie Hunnam, Colin Farrell and the surprise star of the show Hugh Grant elevates the expectations a little for me. I love Colin Farrell, Charlie Hunnam seems promising in everything I’ve seen of him, and McConaughey is one of the best in the business. All three sell the fast-paced dialogue and excessive nature of everything well. Even little things like how many different suits McConaughey’s character gets through made me smile, as every new scene has him sporting a new pattern and pulling it off.

Hugh Grant is unrecognisable from the heartthrob audiences know from his various romantic comedies over the years, and he looks like he had an unbelievable amount of fun playing such a quirky oddball. He is the one delivering the exposition, and normally it would be excessive, but the character is so incredibly entertaining throughout that you just eat it all up.

To be honest, the flaws in the movie are all things that you just don’t come into a Guy Ritchie gangster film to see. If you want an introspective drama or a tragic story, there are other films that do that, this is unashamed to be here proudly displaying what it is. You know from early in the film what you’re in for, and it doesn’t change or surprise you. It subverts expectations by what the characters say and do, but mainly because there is nobody who writes dialogue quite like this.

There’s countless cunts and fucks thrown around with happy abandon for the offence people take to that language. There is no time for you to dwell on it, because before you know it, you’re into the next scene and something else bonkers is happening.

There is something in most of Guy Ritchie’s films that have reminded me of Tarantino, and this is another one where I can see shades of it. The difference, at least for now, is that Tarantino somehow takes a similar strain of over the top craziness and funnels it into a more investing story, something which The Gentlemen never threatens to do.

There is a narrative at play, but it felt like it’s just a vessel to get us to the next moment. I laughed consistently throughout, I was hooked by the performances, but I never cared. It never made me feel something for the characters, and that’s what holds this style of film back now.

If you enjoy Snatch or Lock Stock, this will be a fantastic ride for you. It’s got all the hallmarks of those films and a few references here and there, but if you want something to make you think or challenge you emotionally, this isn’t the film for it. This film is here to give you a good time, and in Oscar season it came along at just the right time for me.

Good: Dialogue, Performances, plenty of laughs and dripping with style.

Bad: Not going to make you feel much, no real connection to any characters.

7/10 – Guy Ritchie having some fun. 

 

Triple Frontier Review

Netflix have been putting more and more money into the production of its own content. They’ve found a lot of success with the series they have produced, but their own movies have struggled to be consistent. They tend to be predictable stories with A list talent, and the net results has to date have been inconsistent. Triple Frontier brings Oscar Isaac, Ben Affleck, Charlie Hunnam and Pedro Pascal. 

They are all very talents actors, capable of carrying the movie on their own shoulders. The film does a good job is a good sense of camaraderie between the entire group when they’re together and the character moments between them are what the filmmakers attempt to use to take Triple Frontier to another level. The group face a lot of challenges through the film, and each actor has a moment to deliver something great. Oscar Isaac is top of the bill for me, but Affleck and Hunnam come to play as well. Pedro Pascal and Garrett Hedlund are given less to do, kind of playing “the other guys” for me but the group all knit together well.

They are all playing ex military servicemen, with different skills and a past we get a hint of without any real details. What you can tell is that they have a bond, and when it comes to it they would lay their lives on the line to save one another. That isn’t often required though, as we learn throughout that these are all very capable soldiers, to the point where they seem almost invincible at some points in the film. They aren’t and the way the tension builds through the film is excellent. Credit has to go to the director for putting together these intense, slow, methodical action scenes that burst into life with gunfire then return to the quiet tension that preceded the moment of explosive action.

One of the reasons this tension is created is by excellent use of the camera. Long tracking shot, slow sweeping one shot sequences, and only cutting when necessary. No action scene is hidden behind chopping between 15 camera angles, something I hate in films. Everything that happens is clear, well shot and feels real. The sound design is excellent, every gunshot pops, and the slow speed of the engagements makes for some of the best military style action I’ve seen in a while.

If the action and the group dynamic are what makes Triple Frontier worth watching, the plot is what might make it a little less enjoyable. The plot is generic, which is fine in itself, but the payoff at the end of the film feels very light and fluffy for what is an intense ride for the majority of the 2 hour 5 minute run time. That run time does feel a little heavy, which I judge based on whether I have looked at the time or checked how long is left during the film. I checked in this film and nearly groaned that there was 45 minutes left. The lack of an engaging premise is what makes the film feel long, and although the third act does pick up the pace a little, it kind of loses its way a little. The finale of the film was a bit odd, and the storytelling choices the make didn’t really make sense with me, given everything that happens in the film.

Triple Frontier has an excellent cast, playing an intriguing group of characters. At times its like the film can’t decide if they are good or bad people, and the meandering between the two leads to a bit of an unsatisfying ending. The action delivers in a big way, just like the cast, but I can’t help but feel this film delivers less than the sum of its parts in a weird way. The potential with a cast this strong and action put together this well is sky-high, and although it’s a good film, it didn’t quite reach greatness.

Good: Great cast and performances all round, and it has some of the most intense and realistic action scenes of the year so far.

Bad:  Generic and unengaging plot doesn’t give the audience the hook to keep engaged for the entire run time, unfulfilling ending.

6/10 – Much like Affleck’s Batman, this is good, but it could have been great.