Some of the things that annoy me.

Somehow, I have missed that Zombieland Double Tap is now out in theatres. I loved the first one, so I want to go and see the sequel, even if it is 10 years late. It got me thinking that there have been a few films like this lately. I wanted to see Hustlers, but it came and went, Hobbs and Shaw too. I really need to get back into going to the cinema. 

It’s well documented that I don’t watch much normal television now, it’s always a streaming service unless it’s a sport, in which case I stream it from the NFL pass or something. This means I don’t see trailers or TV spots anymore, and maybe that’s making me oblivious to the films coming out, or perhaps the films coming out just aren’t compelling me. Why doesn’t YouTube advertise films instead of web browsers and VPN’s, I’d watch the adds longer than five seconds if this was the case.

In the first half of this year I had a list of every film I wanted to see, for some reason I did not repeat that for the second half of the year, and I have seen much fewer films. That’s upsetting, because it means I have missed out on some decent films as well as bucket loads of popcorn I could have munched through. Salty is the way to go by the way. If you get a mix, I can deal with it, but just the sweet popcorn is not OK. You should consider therapy to try and correct this minor character flaw if you’re one of those people.

My most recent trip to the cinema was alone, and I enjoyed it for the most part. I saw Joker, a film about a loner who doesn’t have any friends and becomes a psychopathic killer. There I was alone, standing behind someone on the left of the escalator to the exit thinking “I understand why he turns”.  In case you’re not versed in the do’s and don’ts of escalators, stand on the right, and get a shift on and walk down on the left. It’s not hard, its basic decency. If you stand on the left, do not be surprised or upset when I push past you and give you a disappointed tut of disappointment.

You know what else annoys me, playing any kind of battle royale with other people who aren’t in my party. If I was a streamer, I would be dropping into Apex Legends with random players all the time, because I hurl insults at the dim-witted nincompoops that I seem to be regularly paired with. The idea is you drop together and search different buildings. Not drop right next to me and run into the same room. Who is that benefiting exactly? I get half my loot, and you steal half my loot when you could have had your own stuff in another place. Meanwhile our enemies are strategically sharing the loot out as they should and it’s no wonder when it comes to a firefight, I am reloading my running out of bullets in my shitty Mozambique shotgun and having to punch fools to get any kills early game.

Speaking of the Mozambique, why does that piece of limp dicked nerf shooting crap exist on Apex Legends? What role does it fill? It’s a waste of everyone’s time. The developers have spent hours crafting this weapon but forgot to make it remotely useful to anyone. I cannot think of any other guns I hate as much as that gun on other games, but the G7 Scout from Apex was a close contender for a long time. I have reconciled with the G7 since then and now appreciate what it offers, but the Mozambique is a piece of shite and anyone who says otherwise is wrong.

In case it wasn’t obvious from the random nature of this post, I am over tired today. I have started to play Fortnite with mates and somehow, with very little skill, we are nearly winning games. Most of the time we are being idiots and making jokes, but then at some point in the final game it became serious. I don’t remember the gun play on Fortnite being so good, but I really enjoyed that aspect. Normally the reason we don’t win is because the final team we must fight is Bob the Builder and his friends. We win almost every gunfight that’s not super heavy on the building side, and then as soon as someone is chucking stairs and walls left right and centre as well as shooting at us, we are done for.

We will win a game at some point, and that is when I will finally feel I can retire from Fortnite again. Ironically it will be when I am capable at the game again, which is a bit of an odd time to stop, but that’s just how I tend to play these games. I got pretty good at Apex, top 3 was the minimum, and now I have played one game in the last month just to see the new map.

I am going to have fun trying to title this one. It turned into a list of things I can’t stand but there you go. Anyway I am at a respectable amount of words now, so I will leave it here. Have a great weekend!

‘Til Monday.

ChAzJS

 

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Between Two Ferns Review

I don’t know how I had never heard of the Between Two Ferns show on YouTube before. If you don’t know what it is, it’s an interview show hosted by Zach Galifianakis, and he ask’s some of Hollywood’s biggest names some very insulting questions to hilarious effect. I discovered this all by watching the mockumentary about the making of the show “Between Two Ferns: The Movie” which is now on Netflix. 

I can honestly say I do not remember laughing as hard as this watching anything since maybe the Pink Panther movies when I was a child. Something about it just hit me exactly in the right way and I was laughing for most of the brisk hour and 22-minute run time. Zach is so good in this role, his ability to say the most absurd things and keep a completely straight face leads to some amazingly funny moments. He’s so good in the role, because he is playing himself. There is a lot of him in the role, but it’s just all dialled up to 11.

The 3 crew members he works with are a solid supporting cast and have moments to show they can deliver some great laughs too. They are never front and centre long enough for us to feel any real connection and even in the scenes when it seems like we are starting to build to that we get another joke that stops it developing. I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing, but it does mean the entire film rests on the audience being fans of Zach and his style.

The premise is that they must make ten episodes of the show on the road, and that leads to where the movie is at its best, the interviews. Zach’s deadpan face and the generally great job by the actors and actresses who play it straight as well really made me laugh. It’s juvenile at times but there is enough gold in these moments to warrant spending the time to watch the film.

The film’s structure is like a lot of similar sketches stitched together. Sewing together the interviews is the challenge the film faces, and it has moments where it struggles. The humour can be hit and miss in these sections. Whilst the highs don’t reach the same level as the interviews, the jokes that missed don’t really grind the film to a halt either. There is always another moment just around the corner. The film doesn’t let you dwell on an unfunny moment because you’re into the next moment, and this scatter gun approach works for the most part.

It’s only when I have stopped to really think about those moment in between the laughs that I’ve realised there are chunks of the movie where we are just waiting for the next laugh, it doesn’t have a narrative thread that is keeping you hooked that other mockumentaries like “American Vandal” have.

That would be a bigger problem were this a series of hour-long episodes like that is, but the shorter run time allows it to just be what it needs to be. A vehicle for Zach Galifianakis to make you laugh for a bit and remember not to take everything so seriously. I personally enjoyed it a lot, and I think a lot of my friends would love it. It’s not perfect but it does have some very good highs that make Between Two Ferns the Movie worth watching.

Good: If you like Zach’s comedic style, this will crack you up. I laughed throughout and the interviews are gold.

Bad: Scatter gun approach may not hit enough for some to think it’s worth the watch, but it really does depend on your sense of humour.

7/10 – Great fun and doesn’t overstay its welcome. 

 

Martin Scorsese’s Theme Park Ride

“Marvel films are not cinema” says Martin Scorsese. A director who is releasing his newest film on streaming services with a limited release in cinema’s, confusing what his actual definition of cinema is. Martin Scorsese has earned the right to say whatever he wants in Hollywood, and it appears he has a bee in his bonnet about the superhero movie craze.

In a way, I understand what he means. In particular, the Marvel Cinematic (awkward) Universe is unlike anything we have ever seen in cinema’s before. Scorsese didn’t mean this, but it’s closer to a long running TV show with episodes released every 4-6 months over the last 11 years. It’s been an incredible ride; one I have very much enjoyed, and I feel lucky to have experienced it happen.

What I think Scorsese was trying to get at is that he doesn’t feel like the films are narrative storytelling with complex characters like the films he enjoys watching and making. I do not agree per say, but this is just a result of the nature of films, and there is no law that says every film must be for everyone. To me, the characters have developed so much over the course of their movies that they’re extremely complex and the newer characters are on the same journey.

I rate movies on this site, a process I find difficult because of the intangible nature of what divides a seven from an eight out of ten. I grade it based on a gut feeling at the time of writing. I have given some high marks to a few Marvel films, but at the same time I would not argue Avengers Endgame is a rival for Martin Scorsese’s 3-hour long Mob drama The Irishman. They’re two different genres of film, and that diversity is one of the things I love about films.

Clearly Scorsese does not enjoy the diversity of films, and his comment referring to movie theatres becoming more like Theme Parks is odd to me. Not because I disagree, but because that’s what they have always been. When you walk around a theme park, every ride is a little different from the last, but they’re all rides. They all have some of the same elements, but they all do things a little differently. Films are the exact same in that sense. Every film poster you walk past in a movie theatre is a different ride. It might be an emotional romantic comedy roller coaster or a gut-wrenching horror log flume.

Marvel Films are the Teacups or the Ferris Wheel. They’re always around, every theme park has one throughout most of the year and in general, people really enjoy them, and they know what they’re getting. Occasionally Marvel give you Teacups on a Ferris wheel, like Endgame, but it all still fits.

Scorsese’s films are like the haunted houses with real actors in them. They’re slower walks that will make you think about different things whilst still giving you the same adrenaline rush, just in a different way. It’s still a part of the same theme park though. Scorsese doesn’t enjoy them, and that is fine. If you do, more power to you and nobody can take that enjoyment away.

One thing I think Scorsese has not realised, is that he’s creating more hype for Marvel films than he is his own movie. I haven’t seen a quote from him about The Irishman, and that should be the film he is talking about. Disney has already earned billions this year and they still have a Star Wars film to come, they do not need the free advertising but I am sure they’re grateful for Martin Scorsese reminding everyone that Marvel films are a thing, slap bang in the middle of the biggest gap between films Marvel has had for years.

I haven’t dived into the reaction online, I am sure it’s the usual mix of diehard fans cursing Scorsese, a couple of people saying he’s right and Marvel sucks, and then a few reasonable people reacting sensibly. If you feel wronged by Scorsese’s comments, get over it. When you break it down, it’s a man who hasn’t seen a lot of these films, commenting on why he feels they’re not for him. Perhaps he would enjoy them if he watched all of them, but he hasn’t, and he’s told us why he won’t be any time soon.

I still love Martin Scorsese’s films, and I love Marvel films, and most of all I am grateful that there is room for both in the theme park.

‘Til tomorrow

ChAzJS

 

 

El Camino Review

If you’re one of the few people who has not treated themselves to watching through Breaking Bad, I envy you more than most people in the world. The show is a stunning blend of excellent writing, great performances and twists that leave you desperate for more. Just over 6 years on from the end of the series, we are heading back to the moments after the series with Netflix’s El Camino.

It’s impossible to talk about this show without spoiling Breaking Bad massively, so please do yourself a favour and do not read on if you haven’t seen the show. Make the time for the 60 odd hours of Breaking Bad and enjoy the incredible ride before watching El Camino.

Onto El Camino itself, it’s a film that sneaked up on me and I am grateful for that. It was a nice treat to find it had dropped on Netflix over the weekend and I sat down to find out what exactly happened to Jesse after the events of the Breaking Bad Finale. The idea of dropping back into that world is tantalising, although I must confess, I was not sure we really needed any more to explain the aftermath.

El Camino picks up from the last time we saw Jesse in Breaking Bad, driving off from his captors and finally free. From there we see the events of the next day or so, interspersed with flashbacks to the previous times and the events of his captivity. It’s an interesting choice to go with for the film, but it fits very well with the style we grew to love with the original series. In fact, calling El Camino a film is a bit odd for me, as it does not feel like one.

This feels like its two bonus episodes of Breaking Bad showing what happened next. As such, I found it to be a bit of an odd experience watching along, as the first hour of the film crawls by at a snail’s pace. I know it’s a bad sign whenever I check a film run time, and when I saw I was only 45 minutes in, I was questioning whether it was worth me sticking with it.

I completely understand why Jesse is how he is, and what the motivations are for him. I just felt like this film was going to give me something a little bit new, whereas this feels very much like a couple of mid-season Breaking Bad episodes. The second half of the film was more enjoyable, and the outcome, even though it was telegraphed from the beginning of the film, feels like a satisfying place to end this story.

Perhaps this is a case of my expectations and what I wanted being too far from what we got, but by the end of El Camino I was very much done with the film. I love Aaron Paul in this role, and he is as great as he was in every episode of the show. Of course, seeing Jesse Pinkman and all the characters we see pop up through the film was fun, but one of the biggest feelings I had watching El Camino was that I now want to watch Breaking Bad again. Not because I loved El Camino, but because I of what I think it’s missing.

It’s not really a criticism, but the film falls apart when you analyse it as a standalone film. This is very much Breaking Bad season six condensed down to two hours, and for me that just didn’t work. At the same time as explaining what happened next, the film also goes into the past and shows Jesse’s time as a prisoner and his day out with his captor Todd. This extra leg work was all very breaking bad, and if this was an episode of the show, I would have eaten it up with no complaints. This isn’t supposed to be just another couple of episodes though, and that is where El Camino falls.

For all the good performances and the satisfaction of seeing where Jesse Pinkman ends up, El Camino just feels unnecessary. I am a huge Breaking Bad fan, but this just felt like filler episodes with a few fun scenes and a nice farewell. Watching this 6 years ago would have felt good, like a nice epilogue to the finale of the show. That epilogue has come 6 years too late for me, and whether that’s a fair criticism or not, that’s how I felt watching this film.

Good: Great performances, some incredible cinematography, trip back to the world of Breaking Bad.

Bad: Six years too late and it feels unnecessary because of it. Answers questions I didn’t care about anymore.

6/10 – Its more Breaking Bad so it’s not terrible. That’s all it is though.  

Three Trailers, Two Action Films, and an Irishman

The title sounds like the start of a terrible joke.

Anyway, I have been out of the cinema loop for about 8 weeks, there just hasn’t been time. Or rather, I haven’t been willing to make the time for the films that have been out. That is changing this weekend with the release of Joker. What it also means is I haven’t watched nearly as many trailers as I normally would, just because the films releasing them haven’t enticed me enough to even watch a trailer. That all changed this week.

First off, I will start with a trailer for a film I forgot was being made; The Kings Man. The Kingsman world is one rife for more stories, although a huge part of the first films success was down to Taron Edgerton, Colin Firth and Mark Strong among other cast members. This one is a prequel and looks like it goes back to the formation of the Kingsman organisation.

Ralph Fiennes is an excellent actor and he looks like he is all in for the role just like Colin Firth was in the first film. The rest of the cast is just as talented as the previous films, so the potential is certainly there. These films are defined by their Director’s flair than any other franchise currently running, with Matthew Vaughn’s style evident all over the trailer. He has a knack for making everything look and feel awesome, especially action sequences, and this appears to be no exception to that. It looks a little like a World War II movie but in his style, which is something I didn’t know I wanted to see. It comes out on Valentine’s Day next year, so it’s closer than I expected, and I am looking forward to seeing what it has to offer.

The biggest trailer this week in my opinion was for the upcoming DC film Birds of Prey. It’s called Birds of Prey, hinting at a team up with other female characters, but this trailer is heavily focused on the biggest marketable asset it has, Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn. I think she’s one of the rare cases where fan casting and real casting came together and got it right. Her commitment to the role and to recreating the character from the Animated show really adds to the character, although I did think this trailer leaned on her a little too much. It would have been nice to see a little more of the other members of the cast. Ewan McGregor as the “Villain” looks great, but there is very little insight into any of the other characters. This is the first trailer, and to be honest it looks a lot more fun than I expected, but we won’t know what to expect until we see a bit more of the surrounding cast.

Birds of Prey comes out on the 7th February, just a week before The Kings Man and as two very stylised looking action movies they may be fighting over the same audience. I think there is room for both, but they might eat each other’s box office a bit which might work out worse for one of them. They’re both coming out weeks before The Last of Us Part II, so whatever happens they won’t be the best piece of entertainment that month.

Last week ended with the trailer for a Martin Scorsese directed Gangster film with Robert De Niro, Al Pacino and Joe Pesci among others in the cast. The Irishman is going to be excellent; you can tell just by reading the names I just listed off. De Niro hasn’t worked this hard in a role for years, but you just know he is going to be giving it his best when he is working with a master like Scorsese.

This film is much closer than the previous 2, with its cinematic release scheduled for 1st November in theatres, before hitting Netflix a few weeks later the 27th. The limited run in cinema’s is a new thing, but one I can see becoming a much more regular occurrence. With the rise of Netflix and other streaming platforms, the way entertainment is made and distributed has changed and now people want to watch things at home on their 60-inch 4k TV screens rather than going to a cinema. I understand that but for me nothing beats a cinema when it comes to watching a movie.

There have been other trailers dropping, for example a new Ryan Reynolds led action film called 6 Underground that looks like Ryan Reynolds being Ryan Reynolds. Now who doesn’t enjoy Ryan Reynolds being all Ryan Reynolds like, I certainly do, but is Ryan Reynolds in danger of being type cast as Ryan Reynolds? I am always happy to watch Ryan Reynolds be Ryan Reynolds, but occasionally I wonder if Ryan Reynolds is happy being Ryan Reynolds in every role or if he wants to branch out and be a Bryan Reynolds for a change or something.

I have confused myself. Thanks for reading!

ChAzJS

 

Marvel-lous Endgame, but is the buzz gone?

I watched a YouTube video yesterday on John Campea’s channel where he discussed the potential that the excitement for the Marvel Cinematic Universe was drying up in a way. If you don’t know who he is, he is a movie & TV critic who used to run movie news shows and now does his own thing. His video is worth a watch if you’re interested in his take on it, but I won’t go into his video too much here. 

This will contain spoilers for all the MCU including Avengers Endgame & Spiderman Far from Home.

What I realised listening to the topic was that I agreed with the points being brought up about the future of the MCU. The recent announcements at D23 were interesting, but none of them really got me excited for the projects. Here is where the sporting analogies begin, it felt a lot like a fixture list being released for a football team. Each season fans eagerly wait for the fixtures to be announced before reading them and there is a universal acceptance that yep, we will all be watching them. That is what I felt watching the D23 Marvel panel. Yep, these are all films I will watch.

Contrast that with the Phase 3 announcements that unveiled all the films that led into Infinity War & Endgame. At the time it looked a little different to what we got, with Spiderman popping up and The Inhumans being bumped down to an Agents of Shield storyline, but the hype around it was incredible. I remember my jaw dropping when they revealed Civil War. I couldn’t believe that was happening so soon. In my mind back then, Civil War was the next big event to follow Infinity War. But there it was on screen, Captain America: Civil War.

That slate brought us to where we are right now, a Post-Endgame world. Endgame was an incredible experience, something never seen before and when we look back on the first 10 years of the MCU we will realise it is without doubt the greatest movie franchise ever. Sorry Star Wars, Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings. If you combine all those movies, you have ten Star Wars films, three Lord of the Rings films, and eight Harry Potter films. That makes a total of twenty-one films which is still two less than the MCU has covered. Twenty-three connected films all combining in one epic finale which delivered on the years of set up.

Endgame was brilliant, but did it actually harm the future of the MCU? With the separation we now have from the film, I think it may well have. Endgame finished a few of our main characters stories, with Cap retiring as an old man and Tony Stark sacrificing himself. Those two were the pillars which the MCU stood upon. Civil War was a film about them two main pillars being divided, Endgame was them coming back together before leaving the MCU they had built to fend for itself.

In sports terms, Endgame for Marvel was like winning the Premier League, the Champions League and the FA Cup in one season, or like winning the Superbowl. But in doing so they lost their best two players. What I think has been an unexpected and tough loss to take, is that their new star player they had to take over from the old guard has just left as well in contentious circumstances.

Regardless of what studio executives might say about “This was always a possibility” etcetera, I think it’s clear Spiderman was being positioned to be the new face of the MCU. They know exactly what they had with Tom Holland in the role, and they wanted to bring that front and centre with great supporting players like Captain Marvel, Black Panther, Thor, Guardians and Doctor Strange. That stable of characters could carry the load while Spiderman becomes the leader of a new collection of characters. Now they are back where they were in 2008.

The current slate is full of characters I know very little about, but the MCU has proved prior knowledge means nothing and they can still make incredible films, for example let me present exhibit A, Guardians of the Galaxy. Guardians came out at a time when we had the MCU stalwarts well in their stride, Cap and Iron Man were known around the world and any films connected to their MCU was a must see.  Shang-chi and Ms. Marvel aren’t doing that, they are coming out in the wake of what felt for a lot of people like the perfect end for the MCU. Spiderman Far from Home even felt like a perfect epilogue, showing the world in recovery and answering some of the questions.

Winning a Superbowl is hard. Losing your Key players before trying to do it again is even harder. Often, we see a team win a Superbowl and then struggle to reach the same level for a few years. In the Premier league, teams go in cycles, winning for a few years then rebuilding. But there are exceptions. The challenge for Marvel chief Kevin Feige is now to turn the MCU from a title winning team, into a dynasty. Think Tom Brady. Think Bill Belichick. Think Sir Alex Ferguson. They have built teams that win, and then keep winning.

I am not sure it’s even possible to do that in the entertainment industry, perhaps I didn’t sleep enough, and this makes no sense. But if it is possible to apply that analogy, I think the MCU may be the best position to do it. I wrote yesterday about DC, and how they are possibly able to take a shot at being the next big thing. I didn’t say that the reigning champion would give it up without a fight.

ChAzJS

 

The State of DC

Yesterday I saw a poster released for the upcoming “Birds of Prey” movie and was reminded that the film is a thing, and that DC’s Joker film isn’t the only project they have in the pipeline. On top of Birds of Prey, they have Wonder Woman 1984 and a reboot of sorts to the Suicide Squad franchise, with a Batman reboot somewhere as well. 

They have previously dropped Man of Steel, where they gave us an awesome Superman in Henry Cavill. The fact there was no real structure around his film to build a wider universe on didn’t put off the executives from wanting to have their own Cinematic Universe based on it, and the leaderless DCEU was born. Batman V Superman, Suicide Squad, Wonder Woman and Justice League followed to varying degrees of success, before Shazam and Aquaman sort of steadied the ship by being very okay.

Crucially, they botched Batman V Superman, and Suicide Squad was a colourful mess. Fun to look at but no real substance to it, DC had fumbled the ball. This was all happening in a time when Marvel was building towards Infinity war and in the same year as Justice League, released Guardians 2, Spiderman Homecoming and Thor Ragnarok.

If done right in with the state of pop culture today, Justice League should be the biggest film in the world. It should be earning billions. It earned $657 million. That’s on a hefty budget for both production and marketing, meaning they earned very little on their biggest film. for context, all three of the marvel films earned around $200 million more than that, on smaller budgets.

This sent Warner Bros and DC into a panic of green lighting and then cancelling and delaying and re organising and just generally in a tizzy trying to figure out what went wrong. Well I could write forever on what went wrong, and I probably will one day, but I am wondering if they’re finally organised, or if they are still spinning out of control.

They have Joker releasing in a few weeks’ time, and it appears it is going to be a critical darling and a huge success in terms of quality, Box office will probably be decent if not spectacular. I have written about that film enough; I am excited and hopefully is a sign of DC allowing the film makers they hire to take their properties and make something they want with them rather than the designed by committee feel Justice League had.

Following that we have Birds of Prey coming out next February, starring Margot Robbie reprising her role as Harley Quinn. She was one of the better parts of Suicide Squad, and I am glad they kept a talent like her, but I have no idea what this film is. Harley Quinn without the joker took years in the comics, and here we have her already out on her own, with Jared Leto’s Joker nowhere to be seen from what I can tell. I am guessing a trailer isn’t far off, so perhaps by the next time I write I will have some idea what this film’s going to be. The lead is talented, and Ewan McGregor is in it as the antagonist, so the tools are there for a solid movie, I just have no idea what to expect.

Next June is the most hopeful I am for DC, as Wonder Woman 1984 hits theatres. The first film was good. Gal Gadot has been the shining light for DC and it seems like they’re positioning her at the centre of their universe, if there is still a universe. The poster for this film is a piece of art, and if the film can build on the success of the first, we could be on for a great film.

Beyond that, we have a Batman reboot. The reign of Batfleck is over, and to be honest I was disappointed Ben Affleck never got to show what he could do with the character in a solo film. He has immense talent for directing and acting, and I can’t help but feel it was a wasted opportunity not utilising those while they had him there. Robert Pattinson has taken on the mantle, and Matt Reeves is directing. Reeves directed the two most recent Planet of the Apes films, which were both fun and serious action films. That style and tone could translate well to a Batman flick, so here’s hoping for a return to form for the character.

After that there is a myriad of films slated, James Gunn is making a Suicide Squad movie, which sounds incredible quite frankly. What he did with Guardians of the Galaxy means I will watch anything he touches now. Shazam and Aquaman are both set for sequels, The Flash movie has been in development for years, The Rock was announced as playing Black Adam years ago but so far there’s been no sign of that, and then we have a potential Batgirl film. Oh, and a horror film called The Trench, based on the trench Aquaman dives down in his solo film.

All these individual films sound fun, what’s missing is any obvious connecting tissue. I am assuming that the plan is still to build a Universe that can eventually lead to another Justice League film. Right now, there is no team up movie to connect everything together in the pipeline, and maybe that is intentional. Perhaps they want to focus on the current slate and get each individual character’s film right before trying to bring them together. It was rushed before, that much is obvious, and in their haste to catch up to Marvel they tripped and fell on their faces.

I genuinely hope that all these upcoming films shock me and are brilliant, my fear is that so far, they haven’t made a single film that’s been there for me. They do have a chance now though, especially with Marvel having essentially capped off their MCU for the time being and will be focusing on new characters and ones we haven’t quite got the same connection to like Dr Strange. They’ve lost Iron Man and Cap, the heads of the MCU, and Spiderman is unlikely to be returning.

DC have all their toys, they have time, and they could step up and be the next big franchise. Here’s hoping they can get it right this time.

ChAzJS