The Next Console War

It’s Oscar season which means a load of fantastic movies are out in cinemas…In the US. Even something like The Irishman is so being shown in very few cinemas so I will be waiting for it to hit Netflix. The UK’s lack of film’s I care about, Disney Plus being unavailable, and Death Stranding being boring have all lead to me having very little new in the way of new content to dive into. 

I am into the third season of Chuck, a show I know extremely well and the emotional rollercoaster it puts you on is in full swing. I am also jumping between Modern Warfare and FIFA 20 when I have time for games, as The Outer Worlds just didn’t connect with me. I think I will give it another try when I am in more of an RPG playing mood. My news feed is dominated by football, so much so that I had a dream last night that Brendan Rodgers was the new arsenal manager and was in his first press conference saying Aubameyang was a liability. To be honest I would take that at Arsenal at this point.

There was some news doing the rounds last week about PlayStation executive Shuhei Yoshida being shuffled into a new position, meaning that almost all of the people at Sony that are publicly known as being responsible for the wild success that is the PS4 are now in different roles or different companies all together. Shawn Layden is the biggest name on that list, as he left earlier this year and it all seemed a little odd. There was no big thank you from Sony, despite Layden being there for 30 years and overseeing their biggest successes.

Now, the PS5 is a little bit of an unknown quantity, but when discussing it with friends I get a very PS3-ish feeling. After the dominance of the PS2 back in the early 2000s, Sony was completely overconfident and surrendered a huge advantage to Xbox 360 by launching an expensive PS3, without the online features Xbox was boasting. Their overconfidence at that time led to them having to spend the entire generation clawing back the Xbox 360 in sales numbers, and whilst it did eventually outsell its rival, Xbox won that battle.

This generation, Xbox One suffered a terrible launch, going with a message that gamers simply didn’t care for. It’s still a reasonably successful console, selling millions of units, the estimates would but it between 40 and 50 million units sold. That’s impressive, until you compare it to PlayStation over 100 million units. Such dominance in this generation should be a platform for PlayStation to really blow everyone out of the water next gen, but right now I am a lot more interested in the next Xbox than I am the PS5.

I have never actually been much of a fanboy for either console, well that’s a lie, I am a fanboy for them both. Xbox’s multiplayer is great and revolutionised the industry, but PlayStation Exclusive games are some of the best games in history. I am fortunate enough to own both consoles but next gen I will not be indulging in both again. I will be committing to one because I just don’t have the time for them both, and right now I am not sure if I want to back the more intriguing Xbox or the enticing Sony first party games that I will need a PS5 for.

If I can play my Xbox games on any device like it seems they are going for, I will be very intrigued by it, but I can’t sit here and say I won’t be easily swayed by a God of War 2, or a Horizon Zero Dawn 2, or The Last of Us Part 3, or Uncharted 5, Or Spiderman 2, or Death Stran…. never mind. Xbox’s challenge is to develop titles that can compete with those names I just listed, and that is where the next generation will be decided I feel.

The two consoles will be similar in power and graphical ability, and they will both probably offer streaming anywhere ability. They will both be crossplay I imagine, as that is just the direction things seem to be going. The X factor for both consoles will be the games you can only get in one place. It’s the biggest problem for Google Stadia, who are launching first, with a cool service, but they don’t have anything that I can only play on Stadia.

In the next 9-12 months we will hear a lot of news about the next generation, and I am going to predict now that I will end up buying a PS5. When push comes to shove, I can’t risk missing out on those exclusives, and even if Xbox unveils some new games, I like the look of, I am already invested in the stories of all the games I mentioned above. Except Death Stranding. Because Walking isn’t an interesting gameplay mechanic. Seriously I have watched a few videos and that is all you seem to be doing when you’re playing that game.

I am not sure how I managed to blurt out enough to fill a blog post today, but I will do it all again tomorrow. Until then, Happy Monday.

ChAzJS

 

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What is Death Stranding?

Hideo Kojima is mad. It’s not an insult, in fact it’s one of the things I admire about him. His mind can come up with some of the most complicated and unusual worlds ever seen. He created the Metal Gear franchise and somehow made it make sense when everything in it suggests its rubbish. His new studio is about to release Death Stranding, and I have been looking forward to the game since the very first strange trailer a couple of years ago. 

Last Friday, the review embargo passed, and people started to talk about it. I was intrigued and I wanted to know exactly what I would be getting myself into this coming weekend when it hits the shelves. In Death Stranding, you are essentially a delivery man walking around a desolate world, and the world is populated by various obstacles, be that a valley, a river or a base of people who want to hurt you. Oh, and by weird ink monsters that you need to use your connection to your BB to fight somehow. BB stands for Bridge Baby, and that’s why you have a new-born floating in orange jelly strapped to your characters chest the entire time. Because Kojima.

That is essentially the core game play. Walking around, admiring scenery and then figuring out how to get across it to your destination. You’re supposed to be trying to reconnect one side of America to the other, because somethings happened (the death stranding) that has caused it to be disconnected and just generally not a great place. The graphics look great, and the character models look stunning with performances that are reported as being excellent by all reviews I have seen.

The cast is incredible, and if they are all as committed to this and deliver, it will be a great story to see unfold. However, I have a huge issue with my potential play through of this game, it sounds so incredibly boring. The main mechanics of the game revolve around you walking and balancing the cargo you are couriering along to someone else. It sounds like you’re literally walking between cut scenes, to then be given something to take to someone else. It’s an odd game play cycle, but perhaps the multiplayer elements make it more interesting?

Well that’s another worry for me. If the idea is for me to build structures and find ways around to get me from point A to point B and so on, then the multiplayer seems like it might end up eliminating much of the interesting parts of that. The MP in Death Stranding is odd in that you don’t see other players, but you can find the structures they have placed. People can leave signs for other players with instructions, and even leave useful structures to get around issues.

Initially that sounds good, and I understand what the developers are aiming for, creating a game that encourages you to help others is a noble idea. My concern is that due to the success of the game, it will become a game that is full of other people’s structures, making the game a cakewalk and therefore your path will just be strolling between cut scenes as I mentioned, with no player agency or anything pushing your plot forward.

The game pushes you to have to return to a base and have a shower every few hours, or days in game, because you are a messy boy. You also need to sleep and recover and be ready for the next day when you will select what equipment you need and go out again for another walk to another destination. This level of detail is dangerously close to a game I really appreciated but was bored to sleep of after a few hours, Red Dead Redemption 2.

RDR2 was stunning, a technical marvel and a great story in an incredibly well realised world. The problem I had with it, was the gameplay was slow, unsatisfying and at times boring. It took forever to get anywhere in RDR2, and Death Stranding is a game entirely based on it taking a while to get places. This is a game about the journey, which I normally enjoy, see Borderlands 3, a game where the story is meh, but the journey is fantastic, because the game play is exciting and engaging.

What all this has pushed me towards is that right now, having not played myself, I am really wondering whether Death Stranding is going to be a game I can bring myself to play through. It takes between 35 and 45 hours to complete the story if you mainline the game, and that’s a big commitment to a game when I am yet to be intrigued by any game play I have seen. Right now, Death Stranding is close to becoming a game I watch a super edit of the acted scenes and enjoy the story that way, because I don’t really want to spend my weekend walking around with a screaming baby.

Yep the baby screams if its unhappy. You must cradle your controller and rock it to calm the fucker down. I really hope this game shocks me and I love it. Kojima is a genius, anyone who can create Metal Gear has to be, but I am not sure I can stick with him for this one.

‘Til Tomorrow.

ChAzJS

 

Call of Duty Modern Warfare Multiplayer Review

If you’re like me, you will have played the Call of Duty campaign to get you back into the swing of things before you charge into the Multiplayer. I did so once I had completed the campaign and I am 8 hours in, which isn’t much but it’s enough to get a feel for the game modes. Has it managed to capture the magic from Modern Warfare 2’s heyday?

Judging Modern Warfare against those rose-tinted standards is difficult. I probably spent just as much time being murdered on the old games, I just remember the highlights. Calling in a Nuke on Highrise and finishing the game with 31 kills and no deaths in a Team Deathmatch was a moment probably up there with my best in multiplayer achievements. Second only to my legendary exploits on FIFA Pro Clubs.

Over the years Call of Duty’s multiplayer had become a frantic wall running triple jumping horror show for me. Every time I would play, I would be slaughtered in most matches by people at angles I wouldn’t even think to check. That changes with this year’s CoD. Everything is stripped back, it’s you, a gun, 3 perks and some grenades. That simplicity means it relies more on your skills and reactions, and although I am far from being the Rambo I once was, I am thoroughly enjoying it again.

CoD has always had the best FPS gun play in the world; I don’t think that has ever changed. aiming and shooting feels so good on Modern Warfare that just letting that shine leads to some great multiplayer fights. I will shout “Oh fuck off” nearly every time I am killed, but in reality, the kill-cam doesn’t lie, I got hit, and I died.

This year the Killstreaks are more restrained, but still very useful. The UAV is a vital tool and although most players after level 24 will equip cold blooded to be hidden from this, just forcing an opponent to select that over something like the hardline perk is a tactical advantage in its own way. The air strikes are different, with you forced to be able to see the area and mark it with a laser before the bombs drop meaning a little more risk if you want to get it right. You can’t bomb the ever living fuck out of the other side of the map just to try and spawn kill people anymore, unless you run over there and risk being killed by the spawning team.

I mentioned the Nuke earlier, but as far as I can tell that is not in play here. The top killstreak is the Juggernaut armour, which whilst fun, is probably one I will never see equipped by anyone. The Chopper Gunner is pretty much the top dog in the killstreaks. CoD’s killstreaks have not changed much in general because they’re one of the most satisfying gameplay mechanics in any multiplayer. You’re constantly rewarded for getting multiple kills and that determination to get the next notch on the list keeps you playing.

In terms of modes I haven’t seen before, the new Cyber Attack is a welcome addition. It’s essentially a faster Search & Destroy, but with games that last just as long. Each team must grab a device and plant it at the opponent’s base, but you only get one life. You can be revived though, which adds an interesting slant to the gameplay. If you’re the last person against 2 or 3 enemies, you suddenly feel the need to be sneaky and get to your teammates and revive them and even up the game. It means that the game can be evened up during the fight and I have already seen games go from 1v1 to 6v6 again. It’s a cool mode and one I will probably get deeper into once I have honed my skills a little more in the bread and butter for me which is Team Deathmatch.

CoD classic modes are still present, Search and Destroy, Headquarters, Domination all present and active. The one mode I am yet to play much of is Ground War, which is CoD’s take on Battlefield’s larger more all-out war approach. I will be giving it go but I like my Call of Duty to be close maps and fast action.

I was a little sceptical going into this new Modern Warfare. The love I have for Modern Warfare 2 is deep, and it’s a game that really made me realise how great this franchise can be. Since then, the yearly titles have never reached the same heights for me, but this game is threatening to do exactly that. I don’t have the same number of hours to commit to this game that I used to, but I am very happy that I finally have a Call of Duty game to enter the rotation of regular games I play.

In a marketplace flooded with Battle Royale’s and hero shooters, Modern Warfare is a throwback to the games that started the multiplayer shooter genre off. It’s a return to form for the franchise and a game I will be playing long after release for the first time in years. CoD is Back.

9/10 – CoD’s multiplayer is back to its best.

Call of Duty Modern Warfare – Campaign Review

It’s been a long time since I have been remotely excited to play any Call of Duty game. As soon as the double jumping, wall running craziness started, I was out, and I have tried a few of them with no success. This year’s entry is a reboot of the classic Modern Warfare titles that essentially made CoD into the biggest game on the planet for a long time. The single player campaign was a big part of the original MW games, and this new iteration is no different. 

First, I have to mention the graphics. This is the most realistic looking game I have ever played. It competes with even the Sony first party games and sets the bar for Death Stranding and The Last of Us Part 2 to beat over the next year. The characters are all stunningly detailed and their facial animations are impeccable. This is the closest we have ever come to real people being rendered in game and it really does help sell the immersion.

This year it seems the story writers were given licence to make whatever they want and told to try and be controversial. They succeed at times, and at others it feels like they’re trying to be a bit too edgy. For the majority of the story, I was invested in the characters and the events and CoD legend Captain Price coming back with his unbelievable moustache got me to buy in even more. As the story continues, it’s a pretty standard CoD affair, there are twists and turns but nothing you won’t see coming story-wise. The story is there to give you reasons behind each mission, and those missions are where Modern Warfare steps out from the crowded FPS genre.

During the very first mission, I knew this was a bit different. Your character feels slower, each step feels more deliberate than the sprinting and diving for cover CoD is known for. As you work your way through the mission, you take out the guards as you get used to the shooting and how good it feels to be back playing CoD, or at least that’s how I felt being a lapsed CoD player. At one point in the mission, you enter a warehouse, and the lights are cut out. Its pitch black except for the light radiating from the torch you have that only illuminates a circle in front of you. All the sudden, I didn’t feel like an invincible soldier. The footsteps I could hear in my headphones were unnerving, I knew there was enemies. The tension in these moments is something no FPS has given me in years, if ever. As soon as I saw movement, I aimed at it, sometimes I nailed an enemy, other times I aimed at nothing.

Those moments are scattered throughout the campaign, and the tension is created in different ways. One of the most talked about missions is “Clean House” which is an incredible, slow paced mission that has you doing exactly what the mission name suggests, cleaning out a house. Not a house in the middle east that has been blown apart by a war. Oh no this is just a regular Town house in North London which is full of men, women, children. Some of them are armed. Some of them are terrified. Some of them are terrified, and then they grab an AK-47 and you must take them out.

The shock value feels earned in missions like “Clean House”. As the end of the campaign approaches it starts to wear out, and it’s a little too much. Eventually you’re a little desensitised to the situation of “person looks like they’re surrendering and then they grab a gun”. There are other missions that have their moments, Piccadilly Circus is a stunning recreation and the events happening there are frightening for someone who has walked around the area countless times, and the Embassy mission is the longest one in the game and changes up the gameplay multiple times to give things a slight twist and keep you on your toes.

I honestly did not expect much from this new Modern Warfare’s campaign. I was excited to see Price and the shooting mechanics of MW have never been beat. It turns out that I really enjoyed playing through this campaign, and at the end I was sitting in my chair squealing with delight about the name drops and references. I did not expect CoD to get that kind of a reaction from me. Modern Warfare has brought me back to the series, and even if it takes a couple years between this and the sequel, I am very excited to see what comes next in the rebooted story.

I have jumped in and played a big chunk of multiplayer, and I will talk about that more later in the week. The fact I have played a lot should tell you something though, as I have already sunk more hours into this multiplayer than the last few CoDs combined. The campaign is a reason to play Modern Warfare, and the Multiplayer may just be the reason I stick around.

Good: Incredible Graphics, Stunning set pieces, and some brilliant missions that change up the CoD formula.

Bad: The story will never be that great in CoD games, but it doesn’t really need to be. Some scenes that are shocking for shock’s sake that don’t add to the narrative at all.

8/10 – Modern Warfare is back and I am very happy about it. 

 

Bethesda annoys everyone.

I hate being ill. Yesterday I spent the day laying on the couch staring into space and wishing I was at work. A rarity for me, to wish I was at work, but not being able to focus properly on anything meant I wasn’t even using the time to watch films or something that could be useful for this site. 

Thankfully Bethesda gave me something to write/rant about with the Fallout 76 subscription being launched. On top of the initial £39.99 that they ask for to allow you to play the game, they have now stuck a price on several features that have been heavily requested by the small but passionate community playing that game still.

I never jumped into it, it never struck me in quite the right way despite initially intriguing me. The idea of a multiplayer coop fallout game was something I had always wanted. To be able to run around Fallout 4 with a mate or three would have really added to the already great experience. What I did not want was a relatively empty world populated only by other players. No NPC’s no single player story.

Upon launch the game was met with terrible reviews and it came out with bugs that had been fixed by the communities’ mods on Fallout 4, suggesting that the players were more capable than the developers of the game. That aside, a community began to develop, people love the fallout world and therefore wanted to enjoy this world despite Bethesda’s own mistakes.

Now, ages after release they are releasing a subscription service that players will have to buy on top of the initial fee, in order to get a load of new features. On the one hand I understand why they feel entitled to some money for the development time spent on this, but on the other hand these are not ground-breaking features. They’re essentially Pay to win features like a move-able fast travel point and unlimited storage for the materials you collect in the world.

I have been tempted over the last year or so to jump into 76 and see what it’s like, this has now turned me off completely. It also has put questions in my head about Bethesda in general. They were once my favourite studio. Fallout New Vegas & Skyrim are two top tier games that I will always love. Skyrim came out in 2011, a year after New Vegas, and since then they have not made a game that has really blown anyone’s socks off. Fallout 4 was just more fallout. It released 5 years after New Vegas, and yet was built on the same engine with basic graphical improvements and not much in the way of new gameplay mechanics besides the crafting/building of the settlements. The shooting was improved, but for a 5 year cycle the game felt very similar to its predecessors.

The call for a new engine has been going for years, and although that is not really the right thing to be calling for (The game engine has changed a lot over the years), it’s the easiest way of saying Bethesda need to produce something new. Outer Worlds will be with us this weekend, and that game looks much better than Fallout 4 and it’s going after the same audience. Whatever their next game is will be scrutinised for bugs and errors, things that were once put down to Bethesda’s ambition and their games being so huge in every way.

That excuse has been burnt to a cinder because of games like The Witcher 3, which have released with bigger worlds, more stories, and a lot fewer game breaking bugs if any. Bethesda can’t afford another Fallout 76, and if the past is anything to go by, the next game will likely be an Elder Scrolls title.

Now I am a little bit protective of that property, and I will be so annoyed if they fuck it up. I have played through Skyrim 5 times, on 3 different platforms. I will play the next game on day 1, and if they only give me Skyrim with a fresh paint job and a new map, I will be…probably too in love with the world to care but deep down I will be furious. I want Bethesda to be the best again, but right now they’re so far behind the Naughty Dogs and Respawns of the world I am worried they may have had their best days already.

That was a long winding roundabout way for me to say “I want a new elder scrolls game” but that’s just where I ended up today. Hopefully Friday’s post will be about something more relevant.

‘Til then.

ChAzJS

Fortnite, The Game of a Generation

I played a bunch of Fortnite during its 5th Season of the battle pass. I never got a solo win, but like a generous lover I often came second. I only ever got there by sneaking around and hiding, getting the odd kill here and there, and my only wins came in squads with a group of people, normally containing one player who had mastered the building mechanics. 

I managed to get okay at the building but when you see some of the stuff people are doing on there now, I am just scared off ever trying to play it again. The last time I had a go was a few months ago. I snuck up behind an enemy and unleashed a barrage of bullets into them, only for them to deploy a skyscraper in about 5 seconds and then murdered me from above. It was demoralising and I went straight back to Apex Legends, which has been my Battle Royale of choice ever since, although I have barely touched it lately.

Even with my retirement from Fortnite, I have never understood the hate it gets from platforms like reddit and twitter. It’s full of kids, yeah, but so was Call of Duty lobbies back in the day. In fact, the new Call of Duty has so much hype surrounding it because people my age were in their teens when they played the original Modern Warfare games, therefore hitting everyone right in the nostalgia. Fortnite is the new Call of Duty. It’s the game everyone has played, and it’s the biggest game on the planet. If you need proof, look at the last 24 hours of the game.

It has not been playable since an in-game event a couple of days ago. That event was a giant black hole sucking up the entire map, all the menu’s and everything else, and then just staying there as a black hole on screen. People then sat for hours, probably some streams are still sitting there waiting for whatever is next. This is where Fortnite is setting its trend. Call of Duty became a phenomenon and brought the First-Person Shooter genre to the forefront of gaming.

Call of Duty was not the first game of its kind. Before CoD, there was Halo, before Halo, there was Goldeneye, and the real origin of the genre is Doom. Fortnite came at a similar time. It might be a surprise to those of you who aren’t gamers, but Fortnite was not the original Battle Royale. In fact, it was original a survival game with no battle royale mode at all. It was released in response to the enormous success being enjoyed by PUBG. Since then, PUBG has struggled to keep up the fight and I have not seen much news about that game in a long while. Meanwhile Fortnite, like CoD, has become the biggest game around.

“I am fed up of being murdered by 12 year olds” is a common phrase I say when referring to Fortnite, but I remember being told by adults to fuck off when I was in my teens, because I was battering them on Call of Duty. Every generation has had a game that has defined it, and the youth of today have Fortnite. The current event has brought it back to the front of people’s minds, but it’s never stopped being a success and a game played all around the world.

I was thirteen when I started playing games online, Rainbow Six Vegas was the one, surprising because it’s not Call of Duty 4 or Halo like most people. CoD World at War was when I began playing CoD as a regular hobby and I was very good at one point. I have never got back to be that good, but I am excited to try and get there with the next CoD. I don’t have the hours to spend playing anymore but the competitive streak in me means anything but being the top player on my team is an enormous frustration to me.

That explains why I fell out of playing Fortnite, and why I have never enjoyed Mario Party or Smash Bros. Mario Party’s random nature drives someone with a serious competitive edge crazy. The lack of reason just drives me up the wall. With Smash bros, I am simply shite at the game through lack of playing it. Weirdly I won my first ever multiplayer game of it at a mate’s house using the only move set I know, the good old Suck and Blow with Kirby.

Back to my point with Fortnite, I think this is part of the generational cycle with video games. My generation are the first where Gaming has carried on from our childhood, through our teens and into adult life. We grew up with the consoles becoming more mature, and now there is a new generation discovering gaming in a different way to what we did. My parents’ generation played games when they were kids, but by the time they got to adulthood gaming simply had not progressed to the point where the games were telling interesting stories like they were for me with Metal Gear Solid or Heavy Rain.

I know that there are stories in games that my parents or even my grandparents would enjoy, but they will never see them. They are the “Games are for kids” generation. My generation seems to be becoming the “Games are for adults” generation and both of those views is a flawed way to see it. Games are for everyone, and next time you’re fed up of being murdered by 12-year olds in skyscrapers, remember when you were that kid.

I sat down today to write about Martin Scorsese’s ongoing comments about Marvel. Really not sure how I got here, but glad I did.

‘Til tomorrow!

ChAzJS

 

 

 

 

 

Ultimate Team is….

This year I really tried. I really tried I did. I wanted to like it. I wanted to be hooked and to get into the weekly grind. To get the satisfaction at the end of the weekend when you’ve got your wins and are rewarded with multiple packs and coins to spend on improving the squad. But I just cannot do it. 

I am of course talking about FIFA 20’s Ultimate Team mode. The microtransaction monster that has dominated the game over recent years and been the primary focus of the development team because it makes EA so much money. While most of the game modes in FIFA have gone through minute changes from year to year, every year there is overhauls to how Ultimate Team is played.

I tried a few years back and gave up when I was being drawn against teams with players I have never heard of with low ratings, and then being torn apart because all of them have 99 pace ratings. I left it alone for years only dabbling a little in the game mode to see what’s what. This year I decided to follow my mates and play it, and at first all was well. I opened some packs, and despite how much I hate microtransactions I bit the bullet and invested £20. I got some okay players, nothing amazing, but it was enough to build a decent team and play some squad battles to improve the team a little.

After one week of those rewards, my premier league team was built. Jamie Vardy up front, a strong core and a formation I know very well from Career mode. 4-3-3 is my favourite formation, with a holding midfielder to protect the centre backs. Well in career mode this works, I even have the holding midfielder dropping deep to collect the ball at times. I have everything ready; my team is set up to play in the exact way I have grown used to playing the game in every mode. I am yet to be beaten by anyone online in other modes and I haven’t been beaten face to face on FIFA in about 10 years.

Things start off ok. I jumped into Division Rivals placement games and noticed straight away the gameplay was not the same as in other modes, or even in the Squad Battle challenges. The players feel loose, and they look like they’re barely able to bring a ball under control and tackling anyone is a bit of a lottery. Sometimes your player will come out of the tackle with the ball, other times it will ricochet unnaturally to another player, be that on your team or the opposition.

Ultimate team’s gameplay is like normal FIFA with all the stats slightly adjusted, and a load more random things that at times feel unfairly balanced one way or the other. There is a big discussion about how regularly goals are scored after conceding, something I always thought was much ado about nothing. Having played the game mode a bit more, I have to say it really is oddly hard to win the ball no matter how cleanly it seems like you tackle the player. It makes for a very frustrating game of football and doesn’t give me anywhere near the satisfaction I get from dominating a game of Pro Clubs or leading a team of home-grown players to glory in Career Mode.

What I find most frustrating of all is that Ultimate team has the components to be a very fun experience, but when the part where you play football is the worst part of a football game mode, you have to wonder what could have been. I have had more fun in the squad building challenges than any other mode. Those puzzles have entertained me for hours and I am looking forward to the next load of puzzles, but it’s now just a glorified mini game to me. I sold my squads and will probably forget about the puzzle mode after a while.

Ultimate Team’s days are possibly numbered, with governments all around the world looking into the legality of the loot boxes and the gambling aspects of video games, it may well mean that FIFA ends up with a R/18 rating for gambling mechanics. I can’t imagine that will fly well with EA, so they may need to revamp the mode completely.

For now, though, I will stick to Pro Clubs for most of my FIFA gameplay, and leave Ultimate Team to those who can deal with the frustration.

Have a great weekend!

ChAzJS