Call of Duty Modern Warfare Multiplayer Review

If you’re like me, you will have played the Call of Duty campaign to get you back into the swing of things before you charge into the Multiplayer. I did so once I had completed the campaign and I am 8 hours in, which isn’t much but it’s enough to get a feel for the game modes. Has it managed to capture the magic from Modern Warfare 2’s heyday?

Judging Modern Warfare against those rose-tinted standards is difficult. I probably spent just as much time being murdered on the old games, I just remember the highlights. Calling in a Nuke on Highrise and finishing the game with 31 kills and no deaths in a Team Deathmatch was a moment probably up there with my best in multiplayer achievements. Second only to my legendary exploits on FIFA Pro Clubs.

Over the years Call of Duty’s multiplayer had become a frantic wall running triple jumping horror show for me. Every time I would play, I would be slaughtered in most matches by people at angles I wouldn’t even think to check. That changes with this year’s CoD. Everything is stripped back, it’s you, a gun, 3 perks and some grenades. That simplicity means it relies more on your skills and reactions, and although I am far from being the Rambo I once was, I am thoroughly enjoying it again.

CoD has always had the best FPS gun play in the world; I don’t think that has ever changed. aiming and shooting feels so good on Modern Warfare that just letting that shine leads to some great multiplayer fights. I will shout “Oh fuck off” nearly every time I am killed, but in reality, the kill-cam doesn’t lie, I got hit, and I died.

This year the Killstreaks are more restrained, but still very useful. The UAV is a vital tool and although most players after level 24 will equip cold blooded to be hidden from this, just forcing an opponent to select that over something like the hardline perk is a tactical advantage in its own way. The air strikes are different, with you forced to be able to see the area and mark it with a laser before the bombs drop meaning a little more risk if you want to get it right. You can’t bomb the ever living fuck out of the other side of the map just to try and spawn kill people anymore, unless you run over there and risk being killed by the spawning team.

I mentioned the Nuke earlier, but as far as I can tell that is not in play here. The top killstreak is the Juggernaut armour, which whilst fun, is probably one I will never see equipped by anyone. The Chopper Gunner is pretty much the top dog in the killstreaks. CoD’s killstreaks have not changed much in general because they’re one of the most satisfying gameplay mechanics in any multiplayer. You’re constantly rewarded for getting multiple kills and that determination to get the next notch on the list keeps you playing.

In terms of modes I haven’t seen before, the new Cyber Attack is a welcome addition. It’s essentially a faster Search & Destroy, but with games that last just as long. Each team must grab a device and plant it at the opponent’s base, but you only get one life. You can be revived though, which adds an interesting slant to the gameplay. If you’re the last person against 2 or 3 enemies, you suddenly feel the need to be sneaky and get to your teammates and revive them and even up the game. It means that the game can be evened up during the fight and I have already seen games go from 1v1 to 6v6 again. It’s a cool mode and one I will probably get deeper into once I have honed my skills a little more in the bread and butter for me which is Team Deathmatch.

CoD classic modes are still present, Search and Destroy, Headquarters, Domination all present and active. The one mode I am yet to play much of is Ground War, which is CoD’s take on Battlefield’s larger more all-out war approach. I will be giving it go but I like my Call of Duty to be close maps and fast action.

I was a little sceptical going into this new Modern Warfare. The love I have for Modern Warfare 2 is deep, and it’s a game that really made me realise how great this franchise can be. Since then, the yearly titles have never reached the same heights for me, but this game is threatening to do exactly that. I don’t have the same number of hours to commit to this game that I used to, but I am very happy that I finally have a Call of Duty game to enter the rotation of regular games I play.

In a marketplace flooded with Battle Royale’s and hero shooters, Modern Warfare is a throwback to the games that started the multiplayer shooter genre off. It’s a return to form for the franchise and a game I will be playing long after release for the first time in years. CoD is Back.

9/10 – CoD’s multiplayer is back to its best.

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Call of Duty Modern Warfare – Campaign Review

It’s been a long time since I have been remotely excited to play any Call of Duty game. As soon as the double jumping, wall running craziness started, I was out, and I have tried a few of them with no success. This year’s entry is a reboot of the classic Modern Warfare titles that essentially made CoD into the biggest game on the planet for a long time. The single player campaign was a big part of the original MW games, and this new iteration is no different. 

First, I have to mention the graphics. This is the most realistic looking game I have ever played. It competes with even the Sony first party games and sets the bar for Death Stranding and The Last of Us Part 2 to beat over the next year. The characters are all stunningly detailed and their facial animations are impeccable. This is the closest we have ever come to real people being rendered in game and it really does help sell the immersion.

This year it seems the story writers were given licence to make whatever they want and told to try and be controversial. They succeed at times, and at others it feels like they’re trying to be a bit too edgy. For the majority of the story, I was invested in the characters and the events and CoD legend Captain Price coming back with his unbelievable moustache got me to buy in even more. As the story continues, it’s a pretty standard CoD affair, there are twists and turns but nothing you won’t see coming story-wise. The story is there to give you reasons behind each mission, and those missions are where Modern Warfare steps out from the crowded FPS genre.

During the very first mission, I knew this was a bit different. Your character feels slower, each step feels more deliberate than the sprinting and diving for cover CoD is known for. As you work your way through the mission, you take out the guards as you get used to the shooting and how good it feels to be back playing CoD, or at least that’s how I felt being a lapsed CoD player. At one point in the mission, you enter a warehouse, and the lights are cut out. Its pitch black except for the light radiating from the torch you have that only illuminates a circle in front of you. All the sudden, I didn’t feel like an invincible soldier. The footsteps I could hear in my headphones were unnerving, I knew there was enemies. The tension in these moments is something no FPS has given me in years, if ever. As soon as I saw movement, I aimed at it, sometimes I nailed an enemy, other times I aimed at nothing.

Those moments are scattered throughout the campaign, and the tension is created in different ways. One of the most talked about missions is “Clean House” which is an incredible, slow paced mission that has you doing exactly what the mission name suggests, cleaning out a house. Not a house in the middle east that has been blown apart by a war. Oh no this is just a regular Town house in North London which is full of men, women, children. Some of them are armed. Some of them are terrified. Some of them are terrified, and then they grab an AK-47 and you must take them out.

The shock value feels earned in missions like “Clean House”. As the end of the campaign approaches it starts to wear out, and it’s a little too much. Eventually you’re a little desensitised to the situation of “person looks like they’re surrendering and then they grab a gun”. There are other missions that have their moments, Piccadilly Circus is a stunning recreation and the events happening there are frightening for someone who has walked around the area countless times, and the Embassy mission is the longest one in the game and changes up the gameplay multiple times to give things a slight twist and keep you on your toes.

I honestly did not expect much from this new Modern Warfare’s campaign. I was excited to see Price and the shooting mechanics of MW have never been beat. It turns out that I really enjoyed playing through this campaign, and at the end I was sitting in my chair squealing with delight about the name drops and references. I did not expect CoD to get that kind of a reaction from me. Modern Warfare has brought me back to the series, and even if it takes a couple years between this and the sequel, I am very excited to see what comes next in the rebooted story.

I have jumped in and played a big chunk of multiplayer, and I will talk about that more later in the week. The fact I have played a lot should tell you something though, as I have already sunk more hours into this multiplayer than the last few CoDs combined. The campaign is a reason to play Modern Warfare, and the Multiplayer may just be the reason I stick around.

Good: Incredible Graphics, Stunning set pieces, and some brilliant missions that change up the CoD formula.

Bad: The story will never be that great in CoD games, but it doesn’t really need to be. Some scenes that are shocking for shock’s sake that don’t add to the narrative at all.

8/10 – Modern Warfare is back and I am very happy about it. 

 

Borderlands 3 Spoiler review

Finally, I have finished Borderlands 3. By finished, I mean completed all the main story missions and rolled credits. It honestly felt like a weight off my shoulders, right before the release of Ghost Recon. Now that it’s out of the way I can just focus on being incredibly excited to see Joker this weekend. I am going to go into the spoiler for the end of the game now so if you’ve not got there yet, don’t read on unless you don’t care for spoilers. To be honest, there isn’t much worth spoiling. 

Borderlands 3 ends how it starts, with loads of shooting.  The final battles and final levels are all just jump and shoot bullet sponge bosses, which is ordinarily fine, but being outshone by other bosses earlier in the game isn’t a great look for Tyreen and Troy Calypso. The twins who have been one step ahead of you and the Crimson Raiders all game finally confront you, but don’t use any of the powers we have seen them display through the games story cut scenes up to this point, its flabbergasting.

Finally found a reason to use the word flabbergasting.

Troy Calypso has become a powerful Siren in his own right and has been using an ability called “Phaselock” on an entire Moon to pull it towards a planet. Does he use this Phase lock on you, the one who has wiped out thousands of his minions and is now clearly the only obstacle in his way? of course not. It’s not even acknowledged as something he could do in the final battle with him.

Tyreen spends the game leeching peoples life away with ease, even stripping Crimson Raiders leader Lilith of her powers. You fight her and she has essentially become a god we are told. Well tell that to my machine gun. She is the final fight in the story mode, and it’s one of the easiest fights in the game, perhaps surpassed only by Troy. I didn’t come close to dying in either fight and all they involved was jumping over some sweeping attacks and running in circles and shooting them.

Perhaps I had overpowered weapons and a higher-level character? Well according to the game I was levels below both Troy and Tyreen, and my guns even lower than that. The guns are the only reason it was slightly enjoyable to play through, as I was continuously throwing my Tediore submachine guns around, so I had a mini army of turrets. The range of guns really is this game saving grace.

I must point out that I didn’t want to be pummelled Dark souls’ style in Borderlands 3, I just wanted to see something a bit different for the final few fights. There is a Vault monster earlier in the game where the attacks it has are wildly varied, and then it affects the actual battle area you are fighting in and you have to think about what you are doing and where you are positioned, as well as pumping him full of bullets, and fighting off minions. It’s a challengingly fun boss fight, and me and a mate played it and really enjoyed it. That high bar is never touched again, and it is a more intimidating presence than the “Destroyer” that is spoken about and then revealed at the end.

Mechanics aside, the story is quite good, and I found it entertaining and its attempts at an emotional twist at the end are well done. I am not entirely sure what or how Lilith does what she does, but it certainly looks cool. Borderlands has set up Siren’s to be this bad ass thing, but I have no idea what their powers are supposed to be. They all seem to be capable of whatever the story requires of them. The main issue I have with the story in Borderlands 3 is that the character you play as, the one doing all the work, is completely unimportant to the story. You’re referred to as Vault Hunter all game, not by the name of the character you chose, and you’re not in any of the cut scenes.

It’s so odd, you spend 20 minutes fighting a boss battle, only for your guy to be completely ignored in the scenes. Quite what the point in all the customisation was is beyond me, as you only ever see your character when you perform an Emote or get into a vehicle. I played as Zane, and early game I felt like there was a connection brewing between Zane and Ava, a parent daughter type thing, and perhaps that was intended. The final missions she comes along and maybe that was supposed to pay off there, but due to Zane being missing from every cut scene. I felt sort of detached from the main story. Sure, Tyreen and Troy did some awful stuff, but no character has ever shared a scene with my green haired bad ass, so why do I care. It feels like I was playing as a mercenary whose job was to do the shooting for Lilith.

I feel like I am being harsh on a game I did enjoy playing, but it’s because the potential for this game is sky high. Better writing more intelligently set up boss fights with some challenging mechanics in there and including your character in the story would have made this a 10/10 game of the year contender. As it is, it’s a solid game, and a good return to a really fun universe. I hope the next borderlands game takes what 3 has achieved and really builds on it. Perhaps giving us the chance to make a completely new character and make them have whatever abilities we choose. It would be something new, and the range of characters we already have is certainly one I want to see more of.

That’s it for Borderlands 3 for me, and therefore this will probably be the last post about the game for a while. Hope you’ve enjoyed reading it!

‘Til tomorrow.

ChAzJS

 

FIFA 20 – Review

Every year FIFA is the game that outlasts everything else. It’s always in rotation, sometimes it is the only thing I am playing, other times I am just dropping in occasionally to get my fix of football. My love of the beautiful game is what brings me back just as much as it is the video game itself. This year there are some changes and an entirely new mode to play, but does it all work out to be a better game?

FIFA 20 introduces a new game mode called Volta, which initially looks like FIFA Street in a new form. It sorts of it, but there is less emphasis on the over the top tricks and one on one battles and its more of a team effort. It can be very satisfying to ping the ball between a few of the Volta players as you progress up the small 3, 4, and 5-a-side arena’s which all have their own style and rules. Some have walls reminding me of the 90s FIFA games when you have smaller sided indoor games available.

Volta is a good idea, but it is some way off being the finished article. If you control just your edited character “Revvy” your AI teammates will fluctuate between being useful and being liabilities. The shooting mechanic is a little broken against AI teams as well, as you will find yourself with a shot you think should nestle in the top corner flying wildly towards the corner of the arena, whereas your AI opponent can hit the target from anywhere. The 3 and 4-a-side games don’t feature goalkeepers, so the problems are exacerbated in these game modes. The 5-a-side is good, but keepers are arguably overpowered here, as the tiny goal they are protecting means every shot is very near them. This creates a game where you are constantly trying to pull off a “sweaty goal” where you run up to the keeper and then roll it to the side for your team mates to hit home.

Moving on from Volta, I should touch upon the game mode I love to hate, Ultimate Team. I have played a bit of it this year to understand what’s there, and its largely the same as every season, the game is just a near perfect engine for trying to tease and extract money from you. The satisfactions from seeing a “walk out” player from opening a pack is a great thrill, but I have had one in the entire time I’ve played, and I have well over 300 players from packs. I didn’t buy all the packs, most of the packs are earnt through the game modes one saving grace for me, the squad building challenges.

These are 11-piece puzzles you need to solve using different players with matching clubs, leagues or nationalities to meet the targets of each challenge. They are immensely satisfying to complete, and although you could probably google it and find a much easier way to get through them all, I found the challenge and reward very satisfying. The few games of ultimate team I did play online and offline were frustrating, either way too easy offline or, once I had won against a few teams of similar level to mine online, I got put against a player who had an incredibly overpowered squad. Messi lined up alongside Suarez and Thierry Henry, all 3 players costing more individually than my entire squad of 18. This is an example of broken matchmaking and what I feel is the game trying to entice people into buying packs because when you see those players, you want them.

Enough about that shite game mode, onto Career mode. It’s been a rough launch for FIFA 20, with its career mode reportedly being a bit broken. Weirdly, I haven’t had any of the issues reported, but I have noticed that the squads are still not updated. Whilst I am grateful to have Nacho Monreal still at Arsenal, it does break the feeling of it being an updated new season a little. I played a full season and a half so far with Arsenal, and I have found it a bit too easy. Without playing many games I won the league and cup double, and the following season I bought Kylian Mbappe for just 130m. At that point I stopped because it just felt too easy, so I will wait for the new update and try again.

Career mode’s big new features are more squad interaction and a new dynamic potential system for play progression. The press conferences and the post-game interviews are well presented, but they appear to have very little effect on anything. Morale is present in the game but so far everything I have said has boosted morale. Player interactions are improved as you can now respond to a disgruntled player who wants more play time and explain why, but again I am not sure it has any purpose beyond a morale rating.

The dynamic potential is a feature I am very intrigued by, and I think I saw it working a little bit. In my playthrough I played Matteo Guendouzi a lot, as well as Reiss Nelson and both players improved significantly more than I would have expected them to in FIFA 19. By significantly, I mean 2 overall points, but they will make a big difference long term over a few seasons so I will be keen to see how this plays out over a longer time.

Finally, and most importantly, Pro clubs. It’s the best mode. It just is. Unfortunately, EA haven’t paid much attention to it, continuing the tradition of them ignoring their own ready-made eSport. The player creation is a different but gives you the same pro’s after you’ve been through it, and the skill tree is a bit more intricate, but beyond that it’s the same core game I love.

The actual on pitch gameplay is, and I am not sure many share this opinion, a much better game than FIFA 19. FIFA 20 is a much more challenging game to play at high levels online in Pro Clubs, which is how I will judge most FIFA titles. You can easily batter the AI if you’re an experienced player, but the online game modes like seasons and pro clubs test the games metal a lot more. You can no longer float a ball over the top into space quite so easily, as defenders do seem a lot more aware and switched on to attacks. They attempt to intercept all the time, and whilst it’s frustrating to have what you expected to be a well times through ball cut out by a defender, it does give me that feeling that I can improve and learn to get those passes right.

The close control is better than it’s ever been and for the first time I think FIFA has managed to get pace and physicality between players right. If you’re a faster player, you will notice that now you have enough pace to get past an opponent but it you miscontrol it in slightly the wrong direction the defender will have a chance to get back in and slow you down with a shoulder charge or a well-timed tackle. FIFA 20 has its own pitch problems though, and one of them is referee’s. The inconsistency is a real frustration for me, as realistic as it is. In FIFA, I expect it to get all the decisions right, and it gets far too many fouls wrong. At times you will be booked for an innocuous coming together when you’re running for the ball, and other times the ref won’t even notice a player taking out another with a late slide tackle.

FIFA 20 delivers this season on the pitch with a more realistic, slower game where your pace is a weapon, but not an overpowered one. Slow build up play and smart off the ball runs are rewarded, and there is some really satisfying football to be played. I will be playing it long into next year, and I think with the incoming patch updates and squad corrections, it will become a better all-round game.

Good: The presentation as always is great, and the gameplay is better than it’s been for a while. New models are promising but need a bit of refinement to be a viable regular game mode for me.

Bad: Ultimate Team is still there, and the referees are frustrating. Career mode needs an overhaul, and it has for a long time.

8/10 – FIFA 20 is a solid platform, hopefully next year they can build on it and address the community’s concerns. 

 

FIFA 20 – Same but Different

FIFA 20 is out Friday, but those like me with an EA Access subscription have already been able to plough 10 hours into the game over the last weekend. I won’t go into the Pro Clubs or any of the online modes, but I have played through most of a season in career and a few games of Volta, so this is just my thoughts so far. I will post more next week when I have had a chance to play the other modes. 

One immediate thing I noticed after coming from PES 2020 last week is the presentation is just so much more immersive when it’s all the correct badges, animations, and stadiums. PES this year runs FIFA close on the pitch but the area around the pitch and the menus and other areas of the game are just not even in the same class. FIFA nails presentation and it has for a long time, so this really isn’t anything new.

What separates this year’s effort from last years is the gameplay on the pitch, and the introduction of Volta football. Volta is essentially a remixed FIFA Street with less of the bombast and more grounded in actual futsal and street football. Players glide with the ball around the futsal court, and your players feel like they have more close control than they ever do in an 11-a-side game which is exactly how it should feel as the close control is essential on the smaller pitches. I should mention so far, I have only played the 5-a-side games, but there are 4’s & 3’s available later in the game. I didn’t spend enough time in Volta to get the full experience or even begin the story mode in there, but what I played was promising and very expansive compared to the Journey we’ve had for the last 3 iterations.

Volta adds another huge mode to the game, a game that already boasts Career, Online seasons, Pro clubs, Matchday, House rules and Coop. That’s all without EA’s favourite mode, Ultimate Team. With all the controversy around gambling mechanics in games, this year could be the last time we see Ultimate team in its current form. Either that or FIFA 21 could be rated 18. I personally hate the mode because it’s paid to win but based entirely on chance. The mode prays on addictive personalities and has been the main cause for the stagnation of other modes over recent years.

Ultimate team is what makes the most money for them, and therefore it’s the mode that has been developed the most.  Seasons and Pro Clubs deserve huge overhauls but they’re not going to be arriving this year. I am unsure why there is no huge e-sports league for Pro Clubs, but I imagine it’s because of the complete lack of attention paid to it by the developer of the game. What worries me is that any development put into it will result in the bullshit of Ultimate teams’ packs and micro-transactions finding their way into Pro Clubs. To be fair I don’t mind Micro-transactions in most games, but in a series that asks for £60 every year, I think its egregious and greedy. That’s why I don’t play much Ultimate team.

I spent most of my time with the game playing Career mode, trying to get through the new features whilst getting a good few games under my belt. The menus and layout are much the same with a few tweaks that have helped with navigation and made it easier to get where you need to be. Little things like being able to go from the scouting screen straight through to the transfer hub when you find the player you want only saves 3 or 4 button clicks through menus. but considering the amount of times you do that in career mode, it adds up very quickly.

This scouting system has not changed from previous years which is a disappointment for me. I love the feeling of finding a player on Football Manager using my scouting network and them becoming a star. That feeling is there on FIFA for a while, but soon there will be lists online of the highest potential players. Or at least that’s how it’s always worked before. There is a new Dynamic Potential mechanic in the career mode now which is supposed to raise the potential of players based on how much game time you give them and train them. This is a game changer for me if it works, but only time will tell. Being only 2 thirds through the first season with Arsenal, I haven’t noticed much. I am giving a few young players a load of game time to try and see if they improve faster than the youth players I am not playing, and it does seem to be working.

On the pitch the improvements are noticeable. One key thing is the ball physics and how your players move their bodies and adjust to the ball depending on the position it is arriving at them. I am interested to see if these animations are fluid enough to not become standard, which is normally a thing with every FIFA. At the start the new animations feel new, and then over time you notice all of them and the game becomes more predictable. Right now, having finished my ten-hour trial, it is still surprising me with different animations all the time.

The other major changes are “strafe dribbling” which enables you to slow down your player and utilise the skilful players close control by shifting the ball from side to side. and then shuffling past a defender with a quick dash when they’ve committed one way or the other. This is counteracted by the defenders new stat, Defensive Awareness, which so far seems to mean defenders are much more likely to intercept a ball when its near their feet rather than the players not taking the ball unless you press a button to make them do it. Changes to the player physics mean you can now run alongside an attacker and your defender will push and try to get ahead of them and steal the ball just by you angling your stick towards them rather than having to hold circle.

As I mentioned my trial is over, and I won’t be able to play more until this weekend, but so far, FIFA 20 has made enough improvements to keep me coming back, here’s hoping I am surprised by Pro Clubs and the Volta.

‘Til then.

ChAzJS

 

Borderlands 3 Review

The wait for Borderlands 3 has been a long one. It’s been seven years since Borderlands 2 really popularised the looter shooter genre, and in that time, we have seen several games take a similar model and be successful. The main one that comes to mind is Destiny 2, a game I really enjoy and think has perfected that addictive cycle of wanting to keep playing to get that next weapon. 

One key difference between Borderlands 3 and Destiny 2, is that the multiplayer isn’t as prominent. The multiplayer side of Borderlands now is a bit laggy and I prefer playing solo which is unusual. I have played a couple of hours in some mate’s games, but my own campaign has been entirely solo. I have just beaten the first Vault, so I am not 100% through yet, but I’ve certainly played enough to know what this game is all about.

The story is driven by antagonist The Calypso Twins, a pair of powerful siblings who are using a twitch like streaming platform to gain followers to join their cause and fight for them. That gives them an army of varied types to blast away with the plethora of guns in the game as you, the Vault Hunter, are tasked with beating them to the vaults. The game brings back several old characters from previous games, all the main characters from Borderlands 1 and 2 are on the cover and there’s characters from side games like the Pre-sequel and even TellTale’s “Tales from the Borderlands” game which is a nice touch and brings everything together.

I won’t go into the story any more than that, but so far, it’s a fine story, and that is all it is. The twins are fun villains but they’re missing the magic that Handsome Jack brought with him. It’s a tough bar to reach, but that is the precedent set when you deliver one of the best video game villains ever. Of course, I am not all the way through the game yet, and they have done some nasty stuff so far, so maybe they will get up near that level by the end of the story.

The reason to play Borderlands isn’t really for the story though, that’s just the vehicle that delivers the enemies for you to shoot, punch, explode and splatter at your leisure. I played as Zane and found his duel abilities all combine quite well. The shield he drops is a mainstay for me, and I swap out his doppelganger and drone abilities as and when I get bored of playing one or the other. They all feel very useful though, and although he doesn’t have an ultimate akin to the others like a giant mech suit that drops down for another playable character, but he does have a more consistent effect on the battlefield. Playing solo his shield provides a very useful defensive option that has save my bacon countless times throughout my time with the game and the drone can pester enemies for you and keep things from getting out of hand.

Each of the abilities are linked to their own skill trees, and as you level up you invest points into the trees to unlock augments and effects that change the way you use your arsenal. Late game, these options become very customisable and will make for some great gameplay fun trying out the different load outs. These abilities all contribute to the core gameplay, but none of them are vital to the game as the incredible selection of guns.

Guns are what Borderlands 3 does best, and it does it by giving you absolutely hundreds of them within hours of the game. It’s rare to get two of the same gun, and if you do it will have two different sets of effects and stats, so there is an even smaller chance of ever getting the exact same gun two times besides from the legendary weapons that your friends might stumble upon too. Every gun has a twist, every gun is powerful in its own way, and they are all brilliantly brought to life with attention to detail you wouldn’t expect in a game with so many options on the guns. Firing pins pop in and out of guns as they fire, a lot of guns have clip counters on them that count down, there’s pipes and nozzles flashing all over the place, it’s the best part of the game and I am glad they got it right.

I don’t believe I have kept the same set of weapons for any two consecutive missions yet, which is testament to the games loot system which is balanced heavily towards giving you way too much. early game you will find yourself having to throw out guns and items in favour of storing more valuable loot in your backpack, but as you invest more into the storage upgrades you can really start making plenty of in game money to keep yourself stocked up on ammo. You can buy weapons but so far, I have not bought one, there just isn’t any need.

Borderlands 3 delivers almost exactly what I expected from it, which is Borderlands 2 with just more stuff. There are more guns with some new tricks and features, more enemies with some slightly different attributes, and some new planets to explore. The planets all kind of have the same desperate tone so far, even if the environment looks different. They all are being attacked by the same enemies and that means you’re having similar fights everywhere, just the scenery is different. The boss fights are varied and fun, offering twists on the normal game play beyond just being bullet sponges, which there are of course.

It’s More-derlands, with nothing ground-breaking being introduced to the formula. They know what works, and they’ve worked on perfecting it. If you enjoyed the previous games you will enjoy this one for sure, just don’t expect anything new. It feels a little like a game made with blinkers on, ignoring the outside gaming world and sticking to its Guns.

That isn’t necessarily a bad thing though.

7/10 – More, More, More.  

 

 

 

This Week In Gaming – 01.06.19

Finally This Week in Gaming is back and its new day (Saturday rather than Friday) means I can get ALL of the week’s news to you without missing Friday’s stories. This week was a packed one for three huge games, Activision shooter Call of Duty, Crystal Dynamic’s Avengers game and Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima’s Death Stranding in more detail than ever before. All the information on those three and the usual waffle below.

What I’ve been playing

I spent most of the past month not really playing any games. The lack of new releases that interest around this time of year left me with nothing driving me to any game, and I ended up playing a bit of Football Manager and the odd game of Apex. That was until me and a few friends decided to dive back into Ghost Recon Wildlands.

Ghost Recon was in the news a few weeks back for the next instalment that was announced for later this year, and that sparked me back into thinking about the countless hours I have spent in the Wildlands world, systematically clearing bases, or at least attempting to before someone drops the ball and we have to fight through it the hard way.

It’s far from a perfect game, but the gameplay is fun with friends, its challenging, and it’s filled a hole in the calendar. With nothing major on the horizon for me I am growing increasingly tempted to dive into the Witcher or God Of War again, with the former never really grabbing me and the latter an absolute masterpiece. Either that or I will just be on football manager screaming at my laptop as my youth team striker misses a chance to put Arsenal top of the league.

Call of Duty comes back to today

Rumours started early in the week that the next instalment in the massively popular Call of Duty franchise was going to be titled “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare”. Not to be confused with “Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare” which is the game we got way back in November 2007. That right, 2007. It has really been that long since that game. To be honest, the name of the game doesn’t really matter, its Call of Duty. It will sell well, but this year the developers have decided to react to the slowly declining sales figures by rebooting the most popular sub-franchise in the CoD stable.

The trailer is intriguing, and seems to show series favourite Captain Price being all Captain Pricey, which I am very happy to see. The trailer did get me interested, and then on Thursday the embargo lifted for E3’s Judges Week, and Kinda Funny’s Greg Miller went through what was shown to the press at the pre-E3 Showcase event. Go and watch the video on YouTube for the full details, but he does go into some spoilers for what was shown that I will leave out here. Greg talked about a change of approach when it comes to the campaign, that right we are getting a full campaign, and he spoke about scenes that sounds like they will be up there with the “No Russian” level from back in the day.

In fact, this new direction is incredibly exciting and it sounds like the touch of some of the Ex-Naughty Dog developers that are working on the game is bearing some tasty looking fruit. The old Call of Duty campaigns were excellent, but over time became a mess and the consistent story told over the first few games eventually meandered into a bland mess.

All of this single player goodness is wonderful, but perhaps the most shocking news is that the game will have no season pass. The developers will be dropping updates for the game for free, with new maps and other gameplay items being added throughout the games life cycle. In an industry that has historically ignored its fans; the recent trend of listening to what people want is really refreshing, led by Epic games and Fortnite. The game releases October 25th, and for the first time in a long time, I am really excited for the next Call of Duty.

Death Stranding: Kojima Unleashed

Hideo Kojima created my favourite gaming franchise. Metal Gear Solid is an unbelievable, crazy, frankly ridiculous world and the stories are almost impossible to comprehend without hours of googling and reading Wikipedia stories. But I have done the hard time, and to me it was an incredible journey that got cut frustratingly short. The Konami/Kojima split was nasty, but Konami’s loss has been Sony’s gain.

They took the madman and let him out of his straight jacket. Death Stranding looks, from the nearly 9 minute long release date trailer, like something only Hideo Kojima could possibly come up with. There are babies in Jars, ghostly apparitions, walking, Ladders that can extend themselves in seconds, more walking, a cool looking bike, and a cast of famous faces that could combine to make one incredible Hollywood blockbuster film. Mads Mikkelsen Norman Reedus and Guillermo Del Toro are the most recognisable faces, and those of you who are big industry fans will know Troy Baker, the man behind a thousand of your favourite video game characters.

I couldn’t begin to tell you what the game is about, or what the gameplay is going to feel like, but I know for sure I am 100% sold on this. I will buy it day one, and let the insane journey commence. It’s with a heavy heart that I say goodbye to Metal Gear Solid, but this new, intriguing world that Kojima has shown us looks like it could be something really incredible. Or it could be a jumbled mess, who knows! It releases on November 8th a lot sooner than I expected.

The Avengers 

There have been rumours about the mysterious “Avengers project” that Square Enix have been working away on for a while now. Well developer Crystal Dynamics (who made the recent Tomb Raider games) have unveiled the official title and a few details about the gameplay have been leaked. The title, rather predictably, is Marvel’s Avengers.

There is no confirmation on gameplay yet, but the leaks suggest a game that is an action adventure game where you can choose an avenger and use them throughout the game and possibly improve their skills. I have seen it described as “Tomb Raider meets Destiny” and that is a really intriguing thought.

I have no idea what to expect really, but a Destiny style live service game where you play as your favourite Avengers is an incredible idea. If they package that in with a kick ass story we could be onto something special. My worry is that due to the wide range of abilities between the Avengers characters, none of them will feel quite as good as they should. Spiderman felt perfect in Marvels Spiderman last year because they spent so much time getting him right, has that same attention to detail and feel gone into every one of the Avengers characters? Will Thor’s hammer feel as good as Kratos’ Axe? Will Iron Man’s suit feel as mobile as Anthem’s Javelins? Will Hawkeye’s Bow be as fun as Aloy’s from Horizon? The truth is nobody will be playing as Hawkeye so that last one doesn’t matter. But the rest does, and if they don’t get it all right it will struggle to maintain a player base for very long at all.

More will be revealed about all 3 of these games at the upcoming E3 show starting 10th June, all the news and my reaction to it will be posted on here over that week, so keep your eyes peeled!

Until next time, thanks for reading.

Chaz