The Lighthouse Review

I was feeling very apprehensive about my viewing of The Lighthouse. I was unsure what genre the film fit into, and the Black and white filter with an odd aspect ratio felt like a useless gimmick. Would this critically acclaimed film surprise me? 

For those of you who haven’t heard of this film, it’s about these two men who are working together maintaining a Lighthouse in the 1890’s, and the film shows their relationship and their descent into madness. Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe star as the two men, and I have to say they both are one hundred percent committed and go all in for the roles.

The cinematography is a big part of the film. The black and white filter adds to the feel of this being set in the 1890’s and the aspect ratio does genuinely add a feeling of discomfort and claustrophobia while you’re watching. Some of the shorts are beautiful to look at, and the score does a great job accompanying the visual storytelling. I do feel like the aspect ratio is a distraction, and I wanted to see the full wide shot of the beautiful landscape shots.

The story they’re telling though, is very hard to put a finger on. The films not actually that slow, but so little happens for long periods of the film. We see them carrying out odd jobs, Pattinson gradually getting more disgruntled with Dafoe barking orders at him, and the environment they find themselves in is a grim one for the most part. The titular Lighthouse, and the actual light inside it, are reserved by Dafoe’s character, and Pattinson is now allowed up there.

Ordinarily, I’d find this intriguing, and in fact I did at first, but then I found myself waiting for something to happen. The intrigue around what is going on is then broken by something otherworldly happening. I think the more fantastical elements of this film are meant to be figments of Pattinson’s imagination, but you’re never sure. Perhaps this is intentional, to try and blur a line between the reality and fiction in the characters mind, but it just seems odd to me. There are tentacles about at times, but it’s just there because they’re an unsettling thing to look at. I don’t expect a film to try and creep me out the same way I get a little unsettled when I come across the tentacles in my Calamari at a restaurant.

It never felt at all unsettling to me, it just seemed out of place. The lighthouse, the tasks, everything about the work they’re doing is so mundane and real that these unusual fantasy elements don’t sit right for me. The film does a good job of setting up this harsh, unforgiving place, that introducing these supposedly creepy elements just felt silly to me.

There are points when the characters go off on what are supposed to be Shakespearean monologues that just didn’t make any sense. They are full of big words and fun sounding syllables, but they come off as just rambling nonsense. I think that might’ve been the point, but it just did not work. There is this running thing with a seagull in the film, which is somehow trolling Robert Pattinson, but I never saw it as anything but a bird standing there.

The Lighthouse is a film that is trying to be clever, and for me it came across as artsy nonsense. The idea of watching two men driven mad is appealing to me. The lack of freedom, the longing for human interaction other than that of the person you work with all day the monotonous, horrible work and harsh conditions. They are all things that would contribute to it, but they aren’t what the film shows. It shows two men driven mad seemingly by some other force, and that just isn’t interesting to me.

I know a lot of people really enjoyed this film, and I am glad for them. To me this is a waste of two terrifically committed actors and will be my example going forward of amazing performances in a poor film.

Good: Performances and Cinematography at times.

Bad: Lack of a coherent story, weird scenes that don’t fit, Aspect ratio is needlessly distracting.

3/10 – Whatever this film is trying to do, it did not work on me. 

 

 

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